Sign up for email alerts from The Monitor | Diocese of Trenton
The Monitor | Diocese of Trenton, NJ  
Advanced Search


home : news : state & region October 23, 2017


7/8/2016
TANF program vetoed in Christie budget
Gov. Chris Christie vetoed legislation June 30 that would have increased funding for those receiving welfare assistance through Work First NJ. Marie Gladney, executive director of Mount Carmel Guild in Trenton, whose food pantry is seen in this file photo, said the veto is disappointing because families that receive assistance are working to become self-sufficient. File Photo / John Blaine

Gov. Chris Christie vetoed legislation June 30 that would have increased funding for those receiving welfare assistance through Work First NJ. Marie Gladney, executive director of Mount Carmel Guild in Trenton, whose food pantry is seen in this file photo, said the veto is disappointing because families that receive assistance are working to become self-sufficient. File Photo / John Blaine


By Jennifer Mauro | Associate Editor

The state’s most vulnerable residents have been dealt a blow as Gov. Chris Christie vetoed legislation that would have increased funding for those receiving welfare assistance.

As it stood, the legislation would have increased funding for the state’s Work First program, or TANF, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. The program is geared to help families become self-sufficient. It also offers job search and family counseling resources.

Currently, a family of three receives the maximum benefit of $424 per month, the same as it was 29 years ago. Additional legislation would have repealed the family caps that currently prevent Work First grants from increasing due to the birth of a child. Christie vetoed both bills June 30.

Upcoming Monitor series takes closer look at poverty

Marie Gladney, executive director of Mount Carmel Guild in Trenton, said it was disappointing because families that receive TANF are working to improve themselves.

“It is a sad commentary when programs that help the most vulnerable populations are used as bargaining chips to negotiate a budget,” she said. “A blow to the program like this sets us backward in alleviating poverty.”

In addition, she said she expects other state and nonprofit agencies to see an influx of people needing help with funding to more welfare programs being cut.

“It leaves all other agencies that do help wringing their hands,” Gladney said.

According to most recent U.S. Census data, the poverty rate in New Jersey has grown from 8.7 percent to 11.1 percent in the last decade. Nearly 1 million people in the state live in poverty.

Patrick R. Brannigan, executive director of the New Jersey Catholic Conference, had testified June 23 before the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee in support of the two bills, saying, “Simply stated, $424 a month does not provide families the same ability to purchase food, clothing and housing as it did three decades ago.”

In reference to family caps, he testified that “these caps deny children help in cases where the parents embraced the precious gift of life.” 






Subscription Login
LOGIN | SUBSCRIBE

From the Bishop
Pope Francis







The Monitor, 701 Lawrenceville Road, P.O. Box 5147, Trenton, NJ 08638-0147 | PHONE: 609-406-7404 | FAX: 609-406-7423 | Monitor@DioceseofTrenton.org

Copyright © 2011 | TrentonMonitor.com | All Rights Reserved.
Any use of materials on this website, including reproduction, modification or distribution without the prior written consent of the Diocese of Trenton is strictly prohibited.

Software © 1998-2017 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved